Loading…

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Breakout Session [clear filter]
Friday, November 8
 

10:30am EST

S1: Keeping the Flame of Community History Alive in Scotland, Maryland: A Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration
This session highlights a collaboration between American University, Montgomery History, and members of the African American community of Scotland, Maryland to create a new type of museum exhibit blending cultural anthropology, archival photographs and recordings, and community artifacts. Working together to uncover hidden aspects of the vibrant community life in Scotland, this team of collaborators strove to portray a fresh perspective on the resilience of Scotland residents. Panelists will discuss the ways they were able to connect across disciplines, in order to “keep the flame alive” both within the institutions as well as in the cultures they reflect.

Moderators
SH

Sarah Hedlund

Montgomery History

Speakers
AP

Adrienne Pine

American University
DJ

Delande Justinvil

American University
LN

Leslie Nellis

American University


Friday November 8, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am EST
Skipjack A/B

10:30am EST

S2: I've Got a Little Something on the Side
You’ve arranged all the records; you’ve described all the records. Now what do you do? In this presentation, three archivists who have taken their archival training and degree and morphed into something else will share their wisdom. One archivist has written about donor relations and how working with donors has enriched his repository’s collections. A second archivist has used her degree to help perform genealogical work for lawyers. The third presenter will talk about her experience with leaving a position and changing her focus from working with the records to informing others about what records can do for them.


Friday November 8, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am EST
Chesapeake G

10:30am EST

S3: Finding a Blanace: Collaborating with Non-Archivists
Collaboration with non-archivists takes place in many settings. For example, Towson University archivists built relationships with unlikely campus partners and discovered how to talk about archives work and how to listen to partner needs in return. Trexler Library at Muhlenberg College partnered with Bradbury-Sullivan LGBT Community Center, navigating different, sometimes competing agendas, conveying the importance of preserving personal stories and new voices, while creating an inclusive, friendly environment. Erie Yesterday, composed of regional museums and historical societies, works collaboratively to promote, preserve, and maintain Erie County’s heritage and applies for joint grants. Come discover how collaboration occurs among these diverse communities.

Speakers
JI

Jane Ingold

Penn State University
FK

Felicity Knox

Towson University
KL

Kristen Leipert

Muhlenberg College


Friday November 8, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am EST
Cutter A/B

10:30am EST

S4: Reference Services in the Digital Age
This session will look at the numerous ways in which the ever-expanding digital age for archival records and information management has impacted the reference experience. The panelists will address questions related to reference staffing in this new environment including: Are institutions seeing an increase in virtual reference and a decrease in on-site reference? Or are Special Collections and archives seeing fewer researchers and less reference interaction overall? How are digital collections increasing the number of researchers discovering collections? What staffing changes are needed to handle new types of requests? How has this impacted staffing of reference teams?

Moderators
DG

David Grinell

University of Pittsburgh

Speakers
AB

Ann Bennett

Laurel Historical Society
CL

Christine Lutz

Rutgers University


Friday November 8, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am EST
Chesapeake E/F

10:30am EST

S5: I Have A/V Materials to Preserve, Now What? A Conversation
Audio-Visual materials can be found in archives of every kind and are particularly vulnerable to loss, whether from obsolescence of technology or physical deterioration. Archivists need to consider all the tools at our disposal for tackling A/V issues so that the ideal of the perfect does not prevent achieving the good. The panelists will offer suggestions for processing A/V material; rescuing at-risk content in a targeted way; potential collaborations to preserve material; serving reference needs using A/V material; and will answer questions from the audience to assist in solving any unaddressed challenges.

Moderators
MC

Megan Craynon

Maryland State Archives

Speakers
CS

Christopher Schini

Maryland State Archives
SH

Siobhan Hagan

DC Public Library
RW

Rebecca Wack

University of Maryland Libraries


Friday November 8, 2019 10:30am - 11:45am EST
Clipper A/B/C

1:45pm EST

S10: Fire and Water: Navigating the Challenges and Unexpected Joys of Large-Scale, High Profile Collections
In this session, three archivists will share how they have remained passionate about their careers despite the day-to-day pressures of processing large-scale collections. An archivist at the DC Public Library will talk about challenges processing collections in the Punk Archive; an archivist at the University of Richmond will address burnout and expectations management through the lens of the Dr. and Mrs. Wyatt Tee Walker Collection, which includes records pertaining to the donors’ civil rights, religious, and ethnomusicology work; and an archivist at the Library of Virginia will summarize her approaches to retaining a fresh perspective and continuing to grow professionally through outreach activities drawn from the records of the Virginia circuit courts. Attendees will leave with strategies to manage outside expectations, enhance relationships with constituents, and find creative outlets to promote the relevance and research potential of their collections.

Moderators
AC

Andrew Cassidy-Amstutz

Library of Congress

Speakers
CS

Cheryl Stadel-Bevans

Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
RB

Ray Barker

DC Public Library
TM

Taylor McNeilly

University of Richmond


Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Cutter A/B

1:45pm EST

S6: Dealing with Controversy in the Archives
Slavery in the United States was the foundation on which many institutions were built and were able to flourish. Four panelists will share the legacy of slavery as it relates to their individual institutions and the approaches they are taking to address this once marginalized yet integral part of their schools’ histories. Panelists will discuss how their universities established formal projects that foster collaborative research initiatives between students, faculty, and other groups, as well as how they develop curricula, foster outreach efforts, and improve access to controversial archival materials by expanding digitization efforts and enhancing metadata for these collections.

Speakers
MB

Mary Beth Corrigan

Georgetown University
EG

Erika Gorder

Rutgers University
DL

Dan Linke

Princeton University


Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Chesapeake E/F

1:45pm EST

S7: What's Next?
You’ve reached an age where maybe you’re thinking about putting that last Hollinger box on the shelf, turning out the lights, and leaving the archives for good. What are you leaving behind for your successor? What fights did you wage over your career and how did what you accomplished make your repository a better place? Our three panelists will look at their careers from the perspective of having left their primary positions behind and will impart their knowledge on archival legacies for those mid-career archivists who are thinking about the day when they too, can relax and reflect on a career well-managed.

Moderators
LM

Lopez Matthews

Howard University

Speakers
PC

Pam Cassidy-Whitenack

Retired, Hershey Community Archives
DW

Diane Windham Shaw

Retired, Lafayette College


Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Chesapeake G

1:45pm EST

S8: Teaching from the Source: Chesapeake Waterways in the Classroom
Educators from a variety of institutions bring together archival records with Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM) fields in this panel discussion. You will have an opportunity to hear from a watermen’s community project leader, a maritime museum educator, and two science educators. Access to primary sources—maps, photographs, oral histories, land records, GIS data, and scientific results—is critical for their research and educational programs. Learn about how they capture stories about local communities and how they use archival resources to teach about the Chesapeake Bay region’s natural resources.

Moderators
MD

Maria Day

Maryland State Archives

Speakers
AC

Alison Cawood

Smithsonian
KL

Katie Leaverton

Cheasapeake Bay Foundation
VL

Vince Leggett

Blacks of the Chesapeake


Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Skipjack A/B

1:45pm EST

S9: Putting out Fires and Sucking up the Water
This presentation will focus on disasters such as the discovery of mold in archives storage areas, mitigating the mold using limited resources, reviewing and updating policies and procedures, best practices for creating effective disaster response manuals, and how each institution developed policies to protect their collections and respond to disasters. Panelists will discuss their experiences and how creating response plans has changed the outcome of disasters. How has your institution responded to the threat of disaster and what challenges have you encountered? The presenters encourage the audience to share their experiences.

Speakers
DF

Dyani Feige

Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts
JB

Jill Borin

Widener University
CM

Carla Montori

University of Maryland
KV

Kayla Van Osten

Widener University
HW

Harrison Wick

Indiana University of Pennsylvania


Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Clipper A/B/C

3:45pm EST

S11: We Didn't Start the Fire: Legacies of Chaotic Custody and the Implementation of a Comprehensive Collections Assessment
This panel will focus on the 140-year custodial history of the collections held by the National Anthropological Archives (NAA), as well as examine the practicalities of conducting and managing an assessment project that requires frequent collaboration with IT staff, multiple project archivists, and anthropologists. Panelists will give an overview of the assessment project; how it operates day-to-day; preliminary findings; and the value of the gathered data to the sustainability of the NAA’s collecting policies and needs. The panel will also address parallel efforts to increase accessibility for NAA users, utilizing both the assessment’s findings and data gathered through user studies and a National Science Foundation-funded fellowship in museum anthropology.

Speakers
DM

Diana Marsh

National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution
KM

Katherine Madison

Library of Congress
GS

Gabrielle Sanchez

National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution


Friday November 8, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm EST
Chesapeake E/F

3:45pm EST

S12: Maryland's Maritime History
Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay and tributary waterways have always been central to its cultural and economic growth. Most of the state’s archives and museums contain at least one collection that speaks to the importance of this estuary bay and the rich history of life on its waterways. This session gives those often-hidden collections a moment in the proverbial sun. Come learn more about area archives’ holdings and the fascinating development of maritime culture in Maryland.

Moderators
PM

Pam McClanahan

University of Maryland

Speakers
SG

Sandra Glascock

Maryland Historical Society
PL

Pete Lesher

Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum
IP

Ian Post

Salisbury University
SP

Sarah Puckitt

Mariner’s Museum


Friday November 8, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm EST
Chesapeake G

3:45pm EST

S13: Collaboration in the K-12 Classroom: Models for Building Archival Experiences for Students
This panel will focus on fostering collaboration with K-12 educators to bring primary source materials into their classrooms. Presenters will share models of how repositories can work with educators to incorporate archival collections into their curricula—from digital engagement in the classroom to in-person research visits to institutions. Presenters will also discuss several types of collaborations that help K-12 teachers and their students locate, interpret, understand, and interact with archival collections while increasing outreach and collection accessibility for the archives.

Speakers
DD

Dana Dorman

Historical Society of Haddonfield
KL

Kate Long

Folger Shakespeare Library
DR

David Reader

Haddonfield Memorial High School


Friday November 8, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm EST
Skipjack A/B

3:45pm EST

S14: Should Their Stories be Writ in Water: A Debate on Preserving Social Media Posts
Nora Caplan-Bricker’s New Yorker article “The Challenge of Preserving the Historical Record of #MeToo” questions how to best preserve stories from the #MeToo movement. While Twitter is generally public, do users believe their tweets will become part of a dataset? When collecting personal stories from social media, should archivists be required to obtain consent from the creators before including posts in a collection? In this interactive session, presenters will debate the issue and two audience members will speak to each side following the debaters. The debate will conclude with a vote to determine which side prevails.

Moderators
EM

Emilia Mahaffey

History Factory

Speakers
BA

Bethany Anderson

University of Virginia
CA

Christine Anne George

Cardozo Law Library


Friday November 8, 2019 3:45pm - 5:00pm EST
Clipper A/B/C
 
Saturday, November 9
 

9:45am EST

S16: Archival Simile: What Academic and Buisiness Archivists can Learn from Each Other
Approaches to managing business archives are not frequently discussed within the archival community, yet the experiences of business archivists are valuable to conversations about topics including extensible processing techniques, limited resource pressures, complex processing projects, and collaboration with broad user groups. Business archives also serve non-traditional users, work efficiently under persistently constrained budgets, and use metrics for common archival tasks in order to demonstrate the value (and existence) of archival labor. Panelists will examine the similarities and differences between the challenges academic and business archives face and how lessons learned working in business archives can be translated into more efficiently managing other types of archival collections.

Speakers
JH

Jennifer Henderson

Hershey Community Archives


Saturday November 9, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am EST
Skipjack A/B

9:45am EST

S17: Moving from Negative to Positive: Working Across Disciplines on Large Photograph Digitization Projects
Historic images are in demand—especially those available for discovery online. At the same time, digitizing large photograph collections can be daunting, particularly when a project involves balancing access and preservation with tight budgets, limited staff, and fragile or deteriorating objects. Outside collaborators can help leverage available resources and increase the effectiveness and reach of the project but identifying and recruiting partners and keeping diverse stakeholders on the same page can be challenging. Panelists will discuss collaborating across disciplines on two large digitization projects, the Religious News Service photographs, 1945-1982 (about 60,000 prints and negatives) and the Los Angeles Department of Public Works photographic materials (about 700,000 prints, negatives, and slides).

Speakers
DF

Dyani Feige

Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts
BE

Barbara E. Lemmen

Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts
NS

Natalie Shilstut

Bryn Mawr College
LK

Laura Kopp Starr

History Associates
NT

Nancy Taylor

Presbyterian Historical Society


Saturday November 9, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am EST
Chesapeake E/F

9:45am EST

S18: Bathtub Full of Beer - A History of the MARAC Hospitality Suite and the Business Meeting Resolutions
Over its nearly fifty-year history, MARAC has held meetings in all corners of the region. Until very recently, one of the hot spots of the conference was the MARAC Hospitality Suite, where attendees could gather after the day’s events to unwind and enjoy the company of their fellow archivists. As the hour grew later (or earlier) and the MARAC Business Breakfast Meeting approached, an intrepid group of MARAC members would put pen to paper to write a Resolution for reading at the Business Meeting the following morning.  In this session, longtime MARAC members will recount their experiences in the MARAC Hospitality Suite and, direct from the MARAC Archives, read several resolutions for the attendees.

Speakers
LB

Lauren Brown

MARAC Historian
JK

Jodi Koste

Virginia Commonwealth University
DM

Doug McElrath

University of Maryland


Saturday November 9, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am EST
Chesapeake G

9:45am EST

S19: Teaching Roles for Archivists: Supporting and Expanding Undergraduates' Primary Source Literacy Skill
When archivists teach, we do so with an understanding of the role primary source literacy plays in the shaping of information literate students. Teaching across different disciplines, archivists introduce undergraduates to original research opportunities, digital scholarship, and unique processing projects in archives and special collections. Whether partnering with classroom faculty or teaching independent study courses, providing single or multiple semester projects, our roles in engaging undergraduates are continually expanding and taking new forms. This session presents three approaches to primary source instruction, highlighting the benefits and challenges of each to stakeholders. The panelists will share their experiences and encourage discussion from participating instruction practitioners.

Speakers
AJ

Alex Japha

Lehigh University
SF

Susan Falciani Maldonado

Muhlenberg College
JL

Judy Loney Silva

Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania


Saturday November 9, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am EST
Clipper A/B/C